About

I graduated UC San Diego with a degree in critical gender studies and psychology. Curious about the intersections between personhood and societal structures, my work have primarily focused on the legacies of coloniality and its impact on (multiply) marginalized communities. My work exploring the queer Asian diaspora was in part motivated by my own personal experiences and my desires to make sense of them. My current interest in the alt-right also stems from the ways in which histories and origin stories of power seem to constantly re-brand itself, thereby gesturing to the lasting impacts of imperialism and colonialism. While in San Diego, I also organized with and participated in queer and trans of color activist spaces, which had nurtured much of my critical thinking and approaches.

As I continue to move through the academy at large, I am also constantly thinking through the relationship between the academy and the publics. The division between these two spaces replicates problematic power relations in which the academic space is often considered the place of knowledge production and the publics as sets of data and/or receptacles of knowledge. Like the ways in which activist spaces were sites of mentorship and knowledge building for me, the distinctions made between academia and publics feels disingenuous to the work I want to do. As such, I believe that scholarship has to be meaningful and have material impact. As I contemplate on the question of why I am doing what I am doing, I hope that my response to it will always be because it matters to the communities I care about as well as feel responsible and accountable to.